The Relation between Infrared Absorption and Multiple Greenhouse Gases

Different types of Greenhouse Gases:

  • Controlled Greenhouse Gases -
    • Carbon Dioxide
    • Octafluoropropane
    • Methane
    • CFC's (Chlorofluorocarbons)
    • Nitrous Oxide
  • Uncontrolled Greehouse Gases -
    • Water Vapor
    • Ozone

Albedo - The amount of energy in a wave, from the sun’s radiation, that is transmitted through atoms or molecules.

Albedo(s) of the Different Types of Greenhouse Gases:

  • Carbon Dioxide
    • Lowest Albedo: 1%-2% transmittance, 2400cm - 2300cm range
    • Other Low Albedo(s): 12%-13% transmittance, 650cm range
  • Octafluoropropane
    • Lowest Albedo: 1%-2% transmittance, 1250cm range
  • Methane
    • Lowest Albedo: 1% transmittance, 1300cm range
    • Other Low Albedo(s): 20%-22% transmittance, 3000cm range
  • CFC 11
    • Lowest Albedo: 9%-10% transmittance, 850cm range
    • Other Low Albedo(s): 10%-11% transmittance, 1050cm range
  • CFC 12
    • Lowest Albedo: 12%-13% transmittance, 800cm range
    • Other Low Albedo(s): 27%-28% transmittance, 1050cm range
  • Nitrous Oxide
    • Lowest Albedo: 10%-11% transmittance, 2250cm - 22150cm range
    • Other Low Albedo(s): 25%-26% transmittance, 1300cm - 1250cm range; 22%-23% transmittance, 600cm range
  • Water Vapor
    • Lowest Albedo: 18%-20% transmittance, 3650cm range
    • Other Low Albedo(s): 30%-31% transmittance, 1600cm range; 35%-36% transmittance, 1500cm - 1450cm range
  • Ozone
    • Lowest Albedo: 61%-62% transmittance, 1050cm - 1000cm range
The pattern that usually occurs in Greenhouse gases is they all have a wavelength in which they correspond to in the infrared spectra, causing a great distiction between the greenhouse gasses. From this an analysis can be drawn that greenhouse gases need to be distinct from one another in order to become a greehouse gas so that each one is either a help or hinderance to the green house process. This is explained through how they work. Whenever the sun's radiation starts to go through earths atmosphere it always hits different molecules or the greenhouse gases, when this happens and the wave is of a corresponding wavelength to the greenhouse gasses lowest or low albedo, then a large percentage of the wave is absorbed
and isn't passed further toward earth's atmosphere. This is also in vice versa with the fact that in will not come in contact with the greenhouse gass; it will even be able to do the eact oppisite and stop the sun's radiation from leaving earth atmosphere if absorbed.

Also with CFC's in the atmosphere there is another problem, CFC’s not only provide as low transmitters of heat, but also contain chlorine atoms that are quite dangerous to the atmosphere. CFC’s are bonded with a high adamancy of low and multiple atom to atom energy bonds, but when ultraviolet comes in contact with a CFC molecule. The frequency of the UV ray causes the chlorine atoms break its bonds with the CFC, causing these chlorine atoms to move freely through the atmosphere until they come in contact with an Ozone molecule. When a chlorine atom is in contact with Ozone molecule it starts a chain reaction resulting in the destruction of over 100,000 Ozone molecules. The depletion of this exceptional infrared wave absorber causes more and more of the suns rays to penetrate earth’s upper atmospheres, descending into the lower atmosphere where the suns rays are associated much closer to earth’s surface causing Global Warming.



Sources:
“Global Climate Change”. The King's Centre for Visualization in Science
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http://www.kcvs.ca/site/projects/climate.html>
“Global Climate Change”. Infrared Spectral Windows. The King's Centre for Visualization in Science
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http://www.kcvs.ca/site/projects/common_files/IR_Spectrum/IR_spec5.swf>
“Global Climate Change”. Collisional Heating by CO2 in the Atmosphere. The King's Centre for Visualization in Science
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http://www.kcvs.ca/site/projects/common_files/co2molecule/co2.swf>
“Global Climate Change”. CFC's in the Atmosphere. The King's Centre for Visualization in Science
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http://www.kcvs.ca/site/projects/common_files/CFC/cfc.swf>
“Ozone Science” Ozone Layer Depletion – Science. U.S. environmental protection agency. 25 Aug. 2008
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http://www.epa.gov/ozone/science/sc_fact.html>
“Albedo”. Encyclopedia of the Earth. The Encyclopedia of Earth. Dagmar Budikova 19 Mar 2008.
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http://www.eoearth.org/article/Albedo>